My first Jig and Test of the the JMP

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My first Jig and Test of the the JMP

Postby BobStrawn » Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:05 pm

Here it is at my blog, http://toolmakingart.com/2009/03/30/jointmaker-pro-first-jig-first-review/

I am designing my next jig.

Bob
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Postby John » Mon Mar 30, 2009 4:09 pm

Bob-

Thanks for sharing-I like your jig.

I agree with you 100%, if you have to rely on the JMP for rip cuts (our idea of ripping is cutting joinery, not resawing) the number of passes is rather large.

One thing to consider, crosscuts need no further work--for example, shooting the edges of a hand cut tenon with a shoulder plane is a complete waste of time and energy--the quality and accuracy of the shoulders from the JMP cannot be improved upon.

As mentioned in the manual, angled cuts need rigid clamping--it's not hard but you cannot skip this requirement unless you simply don't care. Your experience is exactly as ours regarding this type of cut.

I like your approach and it is fun to see the logic behind your ideas. I think others greatly appreciate the generosity you are demonstrating with your posts--I know we are.

--John
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Postby John » Mon Mar 30, 2009 4:19 pm

Bob-

I had another thought regarding your first jig post.

Having played on this tool now for a year now, the only time I get frustrated is when it does not do what I want. It took me about 2 months to accept the fact that I was the "motor" and there was no such thing as one method for every species of wood. I actually like being the motor now--I can do other things in my head rather than worry about safety or noise. Repetitive cuts are something that I can now count on saving me time down the pipeline.

I learned that "what I want" is almost always related to the quality of my fixtures or clamping methods. With a blade that is four human hairs thick, this takes a while to sink in because we are used to power tools.

--just my two cents on a dark and dreary day in Portland.

John
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Jigginess

Postby BobStrawn » Mon Mar 30, 2009 7:27 pm

It is interesting learning this tool.

My second jig is sort of a failure, and there is no getting around it.

My second jig is just a set of angle blocks. My goal was to cut a diamond, like the gemstone cut end on a stick. This mostly works for a fairly soft wood, but as you remove more faces from a more dense wood, the last cuts end up being pretty much off line. A square Greene and Greene type stud works pretty well.

As you add facets, the deflection and error increase. with extra sides, the wood removed eventually eliminates you guide for the last cuts. Sadly the blade is not stiff enough to do faceting. So my question is, how thick a blade will this tool take? Also does the extra force required to push through a thicker kerf, hit the limits of this tool quickly? A more ridged blade might do better on angle cuts, as long as the other limits on the JMP don't come into play.

My next experiment is going to be with willow. Since they make it into baskets, it should work well for squiggle wood. As long as the fins don't chip off. Squiggle wood cut at an angle should make for interesting spirals.

Bob
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Postby John » Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:39 am

Bob-

Doubt willow will make good squiggle wood but let us know. The woods that work best for us so far also tend to be those species that steam bend well. Beech works great. Straight grain is the most important consideration.

We demonstrate faceting (Greene and Greene type facets) all the time and it works well.

Send me a sketch of what it is you are trying to do and let's see if we can cut it.

John (john@bridgecitytools.com)
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