First try at stand/bench hook

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First try at stand/bench hook

Postby Cory » Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:02 pm

Also posted this on my blog.

This is my first shot at making a stand for my Jointmaker Pro. It’s an old end table, but I didn’t want to drill holes in it. I just made a melamine top to fit over it like a bench hook. I didn’t have the bolts on hand to secure it to the table, so I laid out where the feet would go and plunge-routed 1/4″ slots 3/8″ deep. It’s a tight fit, I had to use a chisel to get all 4 feet seated into the holes, but that keeps it from sliding around. It doesn’t seem to need the bolts, but I’ll add them in later.

The only problem I have is that it tips backwards. As I push the sliding tables forward, the sawblade resists that movement. As the tables get to the back half of the table, I’m still pushing but more of the force turns into rocking the table back instead of keeping the sliding tables moving.

I either need a lot more weight towards the front of the table, or the back legs need to be further behind the saw to keep it from rocking. I’m trying to figure out if the suggestion to raise the back 3″ would help with this issue.

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John, please don't make me do physics exercises calculating the tangential forces... :roll:
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Postby Michael » Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 am

Hi Cory,
Nice reusing of the end table. Now you can put it right in the living room of your house and watch TV while cutting! (BCTW does not condone multitasking while using the Jointmaker Pro...Safety first!)

The tipping back of the base is indeed something most people will run into if the base is not either bolted down, or stout enough. The solution we came up with on our Stand is to have the back 3 inches higher than the front. This feature accomplishes two things; it prevents the the stand from rocking, and it makes your arm extension shorter which really helps with the ergonomics.
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Postby John » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:45 pm

Cory;

The solution to your problem is to use gravity...

Do the math.

John
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Postby Michael » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:16 pm

Hmmm, thanks for the help John...

You could attach your JM-P stand to a board or platform that you personally stand on. Basically it enables you to use your weight to hold down the stand while cutting. I think that is what John meant by gravity.

Here are a couple of images of the Jointmaker Pro on the Stand in our showroom.

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Image
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posting images

Postby MikeDaum » Tue Mar 17, 2009 7:43 pm

I read in another post that Michael will be letting us know how to post images (as you have) on the forum. I'd be interested in knowing how it's done.

Thanks!
Mike
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Postby Michael » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:23 pm

The image has to already exist on the web, on a blog, an online photo site, or personal website. It is more of a link to an image than an actual image placement.

Just copy/paste the url for the image into your Message Body, highlight the url, and hit the "Img" button

One of my above images looks like this when it is done:
Image

Let me know if you have any problems with it.
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Portable stand design

Postby MikeDaum » Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:59 pm

I needed the saw to be very portable and designed this simple stand to use with a Workmate or a bench hook. It is made from 3/4" maple ply. I decided to edgeband the plywood - the tool is too beautiful and deserves a decent stand! It's rise is 3" as recommended.

The height of the saw on the Workmate is perfect for my 5' 10" height.

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Postby John » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:50 am

Mike;

Nice simple solution.

Couple of questions;

Do you like the incline?

Lastly, is that particular stand sturdy enough (we don't know, but your input/feedback could be valuable to others)?

Thanks for sharing--

John
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Workmate stand

Postby MikeDaum » Thu Mar 19, 2009 6:02 pm

John,

The recommended 3" incline is very comfortable for me. I may experiment with an even greater incline, but I agree it makes visibility and reach much better.

The base I made for the Workmate is held tight in the Workmate's vise and does not move at all when operating the saw. If I'm cutting oak or some hard wood, the Workmate's "step" is within easy reach to brace a foot on.

At first, I tried positioning the stand facing the front of the Workmate (hence the empty slot you see in the picture in the center of the stand). This was not sturdy enough to prevent the unit from rocking. Positioning it lengthwise worked out perfectly.

You'll see I have common nails holding the saw to the stand through the pre-drilled holes in the unit. I originally was going to use screws, but the nails, set in 1/2" deep holes in the maple stand, are all I need to keep the unit in place. I can easily pull them right out when removing the saw from the stand.

Mike
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Re: First try at stand/bench hook

Postby mschmid » Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:32 pm

Hello,

Partly by being inspired by this thread here, and also by that thread there, I proudly hijack this thread here, trying to stay on-topic and presenting my light version of "JMP-bench hook" (or however you like to call it). It is made of scrap wood. No non-scraps were used, including the maple veneer on the outside of the front supporting wedges:

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It's up to your imagination to figure out why there's a hearing protection on top of the JMP.

As mentioned above I have seen this thread before my JMP arrived, but I did not remember someone else already has nailed his saw down to the stand or bench hook. The nails simply were the only objects in my trash-and-treasure box that would fit these holes in the lower stretchers. MikeDaum, if you read this: we have famous ancestors in this nailing - methodology, Stradivari already nailed the necks of his violins to their bodies (oh well, it was vice-versa: he nailed the bodies to the necks). That's not a joke.

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The front supporting wedge features a protruding strip of beech which fits in a dedicated groove in the bench, and the overhanging lower edge of the front plate acts as "main bench hook":

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The rear supporting wedge acts as a tool- and accessory holder:

Image

My JMP never needs to get separated from it's "bench hook" (or however you like to call it), it fits perfectly in the compartment of a new piece of "furniture" (no pictures - it is made of particleboard! Image ). Many thanks to Rutager who passed me on the exact dimensions of the completely assembled JMP in order I could make this cabinet before the JMP arrived.

That's it. Thanks for looking and reading.

Markus
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