Keeping the saw in one place + repetitive cuts on 6" fl

Discuss general thoughts on the Jointmaker Pro.

Moderator: Michael

Keeping the saw in one place + repetitive cuts on 6" fl

Postby Dennis » Mon May 04, 2009 3:32 pm

I have been learning to use the JMP-1. this is a very fun and interesting tool. I have a question and a couple of comments. 1. I am making boxes (for BCT tool collection). Sawing 45% cuts for box corners is the operation. How do I get the perfect miter cut repetitively on a flat sawn 6" board without doing a "test cut" each time? I have had to "clean the cuts" by clamping them into a shop made miter clamp. My question is how to get a perfect reference every time when setting up the 45. I'm holding the assembly in the center and pulling it up to the flip-stop, but it seems there is a small +/- error each time I move to the 45 position.

Now for the suggestions:

I can hold the saw in one place if I put my foot on the stand cross brace, but with a concrete floor, it would be great if you had some slip-on no-skid feet. I'm using the lowest saw setting (back of saw completely down).

Second suggestion: I would be great to have the JMP adjustment tools "handy" Have you considered an "on board" tool box? If you do think of doing this, you should include a place for a verneer caliper, allen wrenches, a brush, etc. Just an idea.

I love the saw - it causes me to think about LOTS of project ideas.
Dennis
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:27 pm

Postby Michael » Tue May 05, 2009 7:10 am

You should be able to get the same cut each time you slide the saw over to your stop. If indeed it is different each time, please check that the white set screws in the Front and Rear Travelers are tight enough to prevent any play in the curved slot. If the set screws are not making the Traveler tight in that slot, you will never be able to replicate cuts.

Tighten the Keel knobs first, then remove the 2 screws that are in each Traveler. You will be able to slide the Traveler out enough to access the white nylon set screws in the Travelers. You will not have have much space in the Front Traveler for access, but you will just barely be able to fit the allen wrench in there.

Let us know how it goes.
Michael
Michael
Site Admin
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:26 am

Postby John » Tue May 05, 2009 7:18 pm

Have to chime in here--I am at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking and next week will be teaching a class on Silent Woodworking. There will be 11 Jointmaker Pros on a concrete floor and it is a small problem.

First, if you have one of those $10 rubber anti-fatigue mats and place it under the JMP stand, it does not go anywhere (laws of physics in play with the JMP).

I am tall and actually enjoy putting one foot up on the stand brace when cutting but recognize this may not be comfortable for those with less bumps on the top of their heads...

One can make a "foot hook" for the JMP that is nothing more than a piece of 1/8" or 1/4" Masonite (about 30" square) with a couple of wooden blocks screwed/hot melted in place to hook into the inside of the two legs on the crank side of the saw. By standing on this thin platform, the saw can't squirt on you because one's weight is sufficient to keep the JMP in place. Or at least my weight is and no need to comment here...

--John
John
Site Admin
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:54 am

More research - maybe I've answered (some) of my own questio

Postby Dennis » Tue May 05, 2009 9:13 pm

First, John, ENJOY MASW
I've been there every year for the last 10 yrs (except for last - my company thought I should fight a flood instead of going on vacation..) I even took a class from you - got me started on this BCT disease...I think I have almost all of your old tools AND I use them. I'm still trying to find the wine opener though - it doesn't show up anywhere...I did find two Nut crackers and the elusive John Economaki low angle smoother though.......Back to the saw

I found out what I'm doing wrong (at least partially) I think the saw is working perfectly - it is me that is not. This may be helpful to others who start with oversized stock and think they will do smaller stuff after they master the saw. Here are the things I did differently tonight:
1.) I have the back of the saw completely down to minimize the cut
2.) I only crank 3/4 turn (last night a full turn) The wood is wider than 4 1/4" and so it remains over the blade when you raise it. I think I was pushing dust into the cut and causing some issues. The sled moves before it starts to cut, but you get a smoother "engagement" that way.
3.) I put a small amount of paraffin on the blade (i.e. planer sole trick) - this did help when deep into a cut.
4.) I put my foot on the saw base - I actually think this is comfortable also (I'm 6'4" though) - your idea is really good though I will try it.
5.) (this one really helped) I focused on HOW I push the sled. If you push at the BOTTOM of the sled (more in line with the cut) it does push much easier - less tendency to bind up when deep in the cut. I may not have all of the play out of the sled - I did readjust it but there is a balance between no slop and binding.
6.) this was the most important: When cutting a 45 angle across a 6" board, the board tends to want to move away from the saw cut (i.e. in the direction the blade is tipped). I put one clamp against the board to hold it (I have sandpaper on this and the backstop), and the other on the END of the piece. I found that at least until I get the blade buried into the wood, it will move away from the blade and create a small amount of flexing of the blade (binding). By pushing the piece against the end stop until the blade is buried, I took care of (most) of the problem.

I really appreciate this forum. I think I may have some other issues before I'm done and its great to have a place to get answers!

Dennis Janssen
Dennis
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:27 pm

Postby Michael » Wed May 06, 2009 7:59 am

Sounds good! Sorry I forgot to address the saw base movement. John took care of that though.
You may even want to try 1/2 turn of the crank handle. With 6" of wood you will get a lot of resistance, and more upward force on the wood, and more chance for wood movement.
For the times that I cut some rosewood and other hard dense exotics, I was turning the handle under a 1/4 turn. Slow going, but man, the finish was unreal!
Michael
Site Admin
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:26 am

Postby John » Thu May 07, 2009 2:59 pm

Dennis;

Thanks for the kind words and I am glad you are enjoying our tools. It makes a difference.

PLEASE keep posting the JMP issues you encounter--we want to hear this feedback and we want your experience (and others) to be stellar.

Regarding miters, I now believe that all miters should be clamped with jaws lined with 180-220 grit (don't cut into this stuff for obvious reasons.) It stops all of the "squirt" that I have experienced.

MASW is rolling right along. It is hard work, but then I think how hard it is it to learn without guidance and I keep coming back to teach.

Regards,

John
John
Site Admin
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:54 am


Return to Jointmaker Pro General Questions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron