Face Bead profiled inlay

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Face Bead profiled inlay

Postby rwest » Tue Jul 28, 2009 6:29 pm

I just finished experimenting with putting a checkerboard inlay into the edge of a board and then "running" the edge and face with the .375 Face Bead set. The board is cherry and the checkers are maple and cherry. I made cherry and maple sandwiches, and finally used my JMP for the very reason I bought it, slicing off inlay strips! It worked great. Here are some photos of the molding I made, my camera doesn't work great for close up work, but it worked okay.

Rutager
Image

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Postby PFranks » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:23 am

Rutager, that is amazingly amazing! Just incredibly beautiful and unexpected. Could you give us a tutorial on making those checkerboard inlays? I'd love to see how you do it.

Wow!
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Postby rwest » Wed Jul 29, 2009 5:19 pm

Thanks Peter,

The process is pretty simple, step intensive, but not time intensive, except for waiting for glue to dry between steps. I've tried explaining it to several people and they understand the making of the inlay itself, but when I try to explain how I introduce the inlay into the wood to get the profile to look correct, I get funny looks, well actually people look at me funny most of the time! I was hoping to get a woodworking mag. to let me write an article so I would have the help of good photos and editors to explain it. I approached one and was turned down, but this time when I made this inlay, I took many photos and kept sample pieces of the process, so I'll ask another mag. The first picture shows the two laminations one is two cherrys with a maple in the middle, the other is two maples with a cherry in the middle, it also shows the slices that I cut off with the JMP.

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The slices need to be the same exact thickness of ONE of the boards in the lamination, this is what makes the checkers square. The JMP "shines" for this task, I have also used a jewelers saw and hobby miter box to do this.

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The next step is to arrange the different colored slices to make the little checkerboards and then place longer pieces of one of the lamination to make the stripe, I chose cherry, maple, cherry to get the white stripe effect. Then you glue all the pieces and clamp together with downward pressure and side pressure. Note: this is end grain glueing, you want the inlay to be long grain in the long dimension so it can be planed.

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At this point you could take this inlay and slice it and put into grooves in your work piece for a traditional inlay. If you want too profile it you will need to put it into your work piece at a 45 degree angle, (this is where you would look at me funny!) I have done this several different ways, and found the best way to be cutting a long miter in a board and glueing it back together with the inlay in between! after that you run your profile and post the pictures on the forum!

Good luck, and I will be happy to TRY and clarify anything.

Rutager
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Postby PFranks » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:46 pm

Cool, Rutager - thanks! I was wondering whether I could discern a miter cut in the pieces in your first post. I had decided it was a trick of the light. But now I'm guessing it's real, and that's how you got the inlay into the piece. Nice trick!

What magazine wouldn't want an article on this stuff?!? Must be one of those "woodorker" magazines...
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Postby rwest » Thu Jul 30, 2009 2:51 pm

Hi,

Here's a look at were the inlay goes.

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Here's a look at how it's clamped(the miter wants to ramp apart!) I use Melamine coated particle boards as cauls, the glue doesn't stick to them.

Image

Here's another picture of the completed profile, this time mitered, to show how the lines will meet in a corner.

Image

Rutager
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Postby John » Thu Jul 30, 2009 5:55 pm

So Rutager, let me get this straight--you used the JMP for your cuts, and your profile was made with the HP6v2--this question begs to be asked; what music were you listening to during your silent woodworking experience?

VERY NICE work. Congrats!

-John
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Postby rwest » Thu Jul 30, 2009 7:39 pm

John,

Not the Beastie Boys! I have speakers in the shop and run the iPod through them. The music I listen to would I think go over well with your staff more so than yourself, I listen to Alternative rock most of the time, and I think there may be a Beastie Boys song or two on the iPod!

I used the JMP to get my slices perfect and repeatable. Before I had the saw, I used a hobby miter box and jewelers saw, which took a lot of work and would make my hands sore. The JMP is faster, more accurate, and painfree!

I showed the sample to a few woodworkers, and they of course needed to give their explaination on how they thought I made it, and as soon as they would say "router" I would say "NO router, hand plane no sanding!"

I'm looking forward to the DJ-1, I have some cool sketches involving round elements that I will profile with one of the HP-6 soles.

Rutager
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Postby Michael » Fri Jul 31, 2009 1:28 pm

Staff: 1 point
John: zero.

Thanks Rutager!
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Postby rwest » Sun Aug 02, 2009 5:43 am

Michael,

I know you like to give John some "grief" now and then, but maybe that is why he gets the Blog, and he only lets you Twitter!!!!!!!!!!!!

Couldn't resist, Rutager
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Postby PaulMarcel » Sat Feb 27, 2010 12:53 am

So I know this is an old thread, but I'm just starting to explore this forum.

I have to say, that use of the JMP and HP6v2 is stunning. I almost want to order the JMP to try it, but I'll settle for the HP6v2 for now and expand later.

Again, dude, stunning...
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Postby rwest » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:17 pm

Hello Paul,

Thanks for the compliment, and welcome to the forum! The HP-6 is a great tool and very rewarding to use. The JMP is probally the best tool I have found to get nice consistent slices of inlay with the least amount of danger or fatigue, but until you get one you can purchase or make a small miter box and set up a stop and cut them with a fine handsaw. A well tuned bandsaw should also work. Using a tablesaw for such small slices is risky and wastes a lot of the inlay material! I will be making and posting another design soon.

-Rutager
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Re: Face Bead profiled inlay

Postby mel_llama@yahoo.com » Sun Dec 20, 2015 10:24 am

Very nice work! I have been looking at what these images for a while now. Just picked up the latest version of the HP-6, and am looking forward to seeing what I can come up with!

Thank you for the inspiration :)
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