Mosaics

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Mosaics

Postby John » Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:28 am

I posted this idea on my blog but wanted to go into further detail here.

It recently dawned on me that the JMP could be used to make really small mosaic tiles--an enduring art form that dates back over 4,000 years.

Today, with the aid of a computer, we now have the ability to take any image and turn it into a mosaic. Simply Google "mosaic software" and you have many choices to explore.

As far as the Jointmaker Pro is concerned, making tiles/cubes en mass turned out to be rather easy.
Image

What I still find amazing is that the little cube in my left hand yielded 648 smaller cubes--way cool.

The quality and accuracy of each cube is remarkable as you can see below;
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The walnut scrap below was my concept test, it wasn't square but the results were awesome. I dialed in the blade to cut 90 degrees and used a square to align the stock vertically. I then eyeballed the spacing between each cut using the edge of the sliding table as a reference. (You can see the kerf aligned with the edge of the table)
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I clamped the stock to the 90 degree fence with Vice Grips, I found the cheap plastic quick clamps were too wimpy (surprise, surprise). They are good for some apps on the JMP however.

Did not use the rip blade, (I find the crosscut blade works for just about everything I have tried to date) and each cut is about 1-1/8" deep made with about 10 passes per cut. When making tenon cuts like this, I always use both hands to push the table, pause, crank and repeat. The pitch of my blade was such that my stock never was completely off the blade. (The walnut took less passes than the maple.) Ripping wood is less efficient than crosscutting. I did use the height stop and can report back that you cannot measure a difference in depth of all these cuts--works great.

Taping the end prior crosscutting will save you A LOT of time--trust me.

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Once I cut this walnut scrap, I squared up a piece of maple and created the cubes pictured in the first image above. This is a labor of love, it certainly is not hard, and nobody can believe the quality of these little pieces of wood. (It took about an hour to make the 648 little cubes) The same technique can be used to create sticks. It also has spawned two new ideas that I will post later...

I believe I could go smaller, but would need to fill each kerf with business cards to keep all the little tenons from yielding during the crosscuts.

Mosaic software requires your image, the size of your tiles and the colors you are using. If your mosaic will never see sunlight, then wood tones could be really rich. Aniline dyes would also create interesting options.

Once this information is input, the output is a numbered grid--mosaic by number is the best way to describe it. You and whomever you want to help, adhere the tiles. At this size, a light with a magnifier would be a big help.

This is just an idea for those who are looking for a way to make something completely unique. Triangular stock would would work too. Five sides and up do not work. Somebody is going to make some serious money using this idea--because the work and planning will scare away the lazy and the skeptics.

This was fun to explore--let me know if you want us to continue to post ideas such as this--I have to design tools in my spare time....

--John

The image below is an idea I found on the web that could be replicated as a decorative band in a box or ???
Image
John
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Postby User305267 » Fri May 08, 2009 8:11 pm

Keep them coming John. I'm getting ready to start some projects with my JMP and your posts are inspirational!
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Postby John » Sat May 09, 2009 8:30 am

Monday we begin the "Silent Woodworking" class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking--I will post images of the JMP projects at the end of the week.

--John
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