Making your own veneer

Moderator: Michael

Making your own veneer

Postby Blair » Wed Mar 25, 2009 6:55 pm

I like inlay work and you show some examples of cutting your own small pieces of veneer. I have not heard much talk about the rip blade. Also, there is a thinner blade available that you don't seem to find too useful?

Could you enlighten us with your experiments on these other blades.

Blair
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Postby Michael » Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:05 am

Hi Blair,
In that video we stacked several layers of veneer and taped them together prior to cutting. The resulting cuts gave us identical parts, quickly too. The veneer becomes stiffer when stacked and taped and makes it easier to cut with the JMP.

The Rip Blade does work well for its intended purpose. The thing that we have found is that the standard 28TPI Crosscut Blade does everything the Rip Blade will do, but just maybe not as fast. We put the Rip Blade on for when we know there will be lots of with-the-grain cutting to be done; tenons, dovetails.. As mentioned in other posts, the Rip Blade will collect more sawdust in the gullets so cleaning out the blade more often is necessary.

The Thin 32 TPI Crosscut Blade shines with thinner softer materials. Because of the thinness, the blade will drift in larger, denser pieces of wood. But for some model makers using Balsa wood, man, it is amazing. It actually does fine in smaller pieces of Poplar too.

Hope this helps!
Michael
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veneer

Postby Blair » Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:24 pm

I was refering to cutting my own veneer from thick stock. Maybe I did not understand but I thought the video photo was small pieces of rip sawn homemade veneer for inlay. I understand cutting stacks of regular veneer into identical pieces, (works well), but I was hoping the rip blade would cut clean pieces of small exotics into veneer.

Blair Glenn
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Postby Michael » Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:49 pm

Oh I misunderstood you, sorry. Hmm, so you want to re-saw basically. I have made many translucent thin pieces of wood that are crosscut and it works well. I don't see why re-sawing with the grain would be any different. Of course, you are limited by the length and you will most likely have to take small bites, like 1/4 to 1/2 revolutions of the handle per stroke.

Let us know how it goes, it would be a great way to make the most out of exotic pieces of wood.

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More on ripping

Postby Blair » Wed Nov 03, 2010 10:14 am

I have been playing with the ripping of thick veneers and have found it to be quite valuable. You are limited to small pieces but by choosing the right grain pattern, the book matches that are possible are amazing. Because the blade is so thin, the match is very close. For inlay and thick veneer, this is the tool to do this. I have also been cutting oyster shell pieces of dry sticks consistently the same size. A flat on one edge helps to register the cuts and keeps the round stock from slipping

I put up a short video explaining this on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUARY85r6_E

Blair
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Still more on ripping

Postby saratree@aol.com » Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:27 am

Some people have asked me why I bother to cut thick veneers on the JMP. They ask me why I don't just use a bandsaw. Well, I do use the bandsaw on a lot of my thick veneer but there is one thing that the JMP can do, that the bandsaw does poorly, and that is cut without losing the match up of the grain. Bookmatching thick veneers in some of my marquetry work allows me to come up with designs that are unique. A clean match is important.

So, back to work I go!

Blair
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Re: Making your own veneer

Postby dwohl73@hotmail.com » Tue Apr 12, 2011 4:56 pm

Blair

I enjoyed several of your videos....extremely nice job! And such a range of topics, tis amazin!!

Question- What thickness do you cut your veneer on the jointmaker for your marquetry work?

thanks
David W.

BTW - I pre-ordered a jointmaker pro yesterday, so I will be joining this august group later (sometime AFTER august!!).
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