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BridgeCityTools.com Serving Woodworkers Worldwide for a Quarter Century! 2014-11-13T09:33:25-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/feed.php?f=11 2014-11-13T09:33:25-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=459&p=1545#p1545 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Re: First attempt at Kumiko]]> Let me trouble shoot what may be going on as to why you can't see that link.

- Consuelo

Statistics: Posted by Consuelo — Thu Nov 13, 2014 9:33 am


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2014-11-12T06:42:01-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=459&p=1544#p1544 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • First attempt at Kumiko]]> Now I have to figure out how to post a pic !

Statistics: Posted by mvalsi@gmail.com — Wed Nov 12, 2014 6:42 am


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2011-01-12T20:12:09-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=47&p=953#p953 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]>

Statistics: Posted by ALeslie — Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:12 pm


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2010-04-28T15:00:16-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=197&p=817#p817 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]>
Dave,

Yes, I'm in a box making stage and judging by all the books on the subject, I don't think I'm alone! They're fun and challenging to make and give a lot of leeway to be creative. The trays have a 3 Ebony 2 Holly sandwich that caps the top 1/4" of the tray the lower part is solid Ebony. I would have made the sandwich the whole height of the side, but I had just enough of the thin pieces milled to make the caps, and didn't see any reason to mill up a bunch more.

Bob,

Too bad I missed you, I just about lived at the mall Fri- Sun! I'll look for you at next years show, maybe you'll enter something too!

-Rutager

Statistics: Posted by rwest — Wed Apr 28, 2010 3:00 pm


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2010-04-28T13:23:09-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=197&p=816#p816 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Got to see this one at the Guild Show]]> work. I checked in the brochure and sure enough it was.
You may be developing your signature style.

Very Nice!!!!

Statistics: Posted by BobMetzger — Wed Apr 28, 2010 1:23 pm


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2010-04-28T04:25:33-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=197&p=814#p814 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]> Statistics: Posted by ForumMFG — Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:25 am


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2010-04-27T17:32:18-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=197&p=810#p810 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Compound Sided Jewelry Box Trays]]>
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Hello,

I made the compound miter cuts for the corners of these trays and most of the miters on the inner dividers with my JMP. I looked up the angles in the BCTW booklet; Woodworkers Guide to Compound Miters (it is still available and is only 5 dollars, money well spent!) I then entered the numbers into my AMP-6i and transfered the angles to bevel gauges and used them to set the blade and fence. I got perfect results on the first try! I did use my router table for the "v" grooves since they needed to stop at the dado for the bottom. There are more photos and info in the Original Design section of the forum under Confounded, Compounded! A Jewelry Box.

-Rutager

Statistics: Posted by rwest — Tue Apr 27, 2010 5:32 pm


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2009-09-15T10:00:37-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=130&p=463#p463 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]>
Regarding the second part of your question, the only way I could teach another Silent Woodworking class is if all 20 students brought their own JMP. We are sold out of version 1. We are working on the next generation and hope to be in testing phase within 4 weeks. FYI

That said, if 20 of you owners want to go to a class, drop Marc Adams an email (marc@marcadams.com) and share your interest. I would be happy to teach it again.

John

Statistics: Posted by John — Tue Sep 15, 2009 10:00 am


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2009-09-14T16:22:37-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=130&p=458#p458 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Silent Woodworking at Marc Adams]]>
Ive been wanting to ask about how the class was and if anybody would post pictures of their projects? Also are there plans to offer the class again this coming summer?

Thanks, Rutager

Statistics: Posted by rwest — Mon Sep 14, 2009 4:22 pm


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2009-06-13T17:54:08-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=89&p=320#p320 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Getting to know the JMP]]>
The main purpose of this test was to evaluate the process of cutting small dovetails, in order to get a good fit right off the saw, with no paring of the sides of the tails or pins. I didn't worry about chopping a dead flat shoulder on the joint. I was only concerned with how the pins fit the tails. I cut the pins first and used a sharp pencil to transfer the pins to the tail board. I cut all of the tails by eye, lining up the pencil line with the edge of the blade. The joint went together sweetly. These are one-pass cuts in 5/16" hard maple. All of the cuts are dead on. Well, one is off, but that's my own fault, I didn't cut on the waste side of the line. The rest are excellent, and after gluing the joint, are completely tight. After today's test, I can't imagine a better way to cut delicate, fine dovetails. And extremely fast as well. The other joint is hard maple and wenge. And it was cut just as easily. I actually cut the tails first in this joint and marked the wenge from those. Mistake. Even scribe lines in wenge are impossible to see. Yet the JMP managed to do the job. The joint is near perfect. I can't wait to put the JMP to use for my original purpose. That is going to be a lot of fun. Stay tuned...

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Statistics: Posted by JameelAbraham — Sat Jun 13, 2009 5:54 pm


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2009-05-09T08:30:47-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=67&p=300#p300 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]>
--John

Statistics: Posted by John — Sat May 09, 2009 8:30 am


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2009-05-08T20:11:20-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=67&p=299#p299 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • ]]> Statistics: Posted by User305267 — Fri May 08, 2009 8:11 pm


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2009-04-17T10:50:54-07:00 https://www.bridgecitytools.com/discussion/viewtopic.php?t=70&p=246#p246 <![CDATA[Jointmaker Pro Projects • Small Sculpture Ideas]]>
Conventional woodworking wisdom dictates that you don't need to work to tolerances closer than 1/64". Hogwash.

The smaller the project, the tighter the tolerances. This project was conceived first to appeal to my needs (it is a play on "thinking outside the box"), but also to push the boundaries of the tolerance stack. It required square stock of uniform size, accurate setups and careful assembly. No juice and no sanding--more important, I had fun.

There are a few things I will change when I do this again in another form, but otherwise it was very rewarding.

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The setup to make the stock is pictured below. Plane was outfitted with skid plates and the stock was ripped oversize and planed to .187 square. Total deviation with this setup was .0015".
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The JMP setup was nothing fancy.
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The joints were light tight after setup completion.

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This piece repeated three different lengths of stock for a total of 35 pieces and 70 joints. The maximum variation in length was never more than .002". As most of you now know, the endgrain was glassy smooth from the JMP crosscut blade. Not including design time, the piece took approximately 20 hours to complete--5-6 hours to cut the joints. My setups were meticulous--I did not want to deal with any downstream pollution during assembly.
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Each of the six faces are unique and it is fascinating to play with--little discoveries occur that spawn further ideas...
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Variations on a theme are dancing in my head and I will share subsequent efforts as they evolve--I can't wait!

Like all art, the objective is to evoke emotion. Once in hand it excels at putting smiles on faces--and one of them is mine.

--John

PS: There is a detailed post on my blog if you desire more construction info.

Statistics: Posted by John — Fri Apr 17, 2009 10:50 am


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