Emma International 2014: Last Installment

The images below represent a very small sampling of what took place in the woods of northern Saskatchewan this past August. It is almost a disservice to all who participated but I have an excellent excuse – the night before the big auction in Saskatoon, I somehow managed to bend the lens tube on my camera limiting it’s ability to focus. In addition, the auction was absolutely jam packed with people making it difficult to take pictures.

This is the collaborative chair made possible by the imagination of Michael Cooper. If I am not mistaken, I think six artists worked on this piece.
chair

The finished copper hat – although one can wear it, it is a sculpture.
hat

Keep in mind, when we all showed up at Emma, most of what was made was from material found at (or around) the site. Here’s a fun way to upcycle and old door section.
old door

sculpture 8

Emma all stars 7

Emma all stars 6

This stool, made from two old shovels was actually comfortable for short breaks.
stool

sculpture 5
This table set the record for the most expensive piece sold at the Thursday night auction. A two person bidding war drove the price just north of $9,000.
Table
This rattle sold for $1200. I wanted it but backed out of the auction @ $800.00
rattle
This is an image from the Emma grounds, things like this are all over the site.
Post
This necklace has a piece in it from everybody participating in 2014.
necklace

mask
This is a kinetic sculpture that has several moving components.
kenetic sculpture
While uploading this image to this blog, I just saw where these pieces are actually a word…
Enamel

bowl 7

bowl 3
This basket accompanied me back to Portland.
basket

axe

belt
This is a close-up of a textural element and milk paint…
texture
This is the scene from the silent auction open only to the makers. Over $20,000 was spent – that is really cool.
silent auction

Bowl 2
What a fun piece!
bowl sculpture

birch bowl

Like most cities, galleries are often located in areas where the rent is low. This is the scene across the street from the gallery hosting the aucton…
hi grade furniture

sign



Both auctions raised approximately $100,000 – how cool is that? I really have never seen anything like it and can’t remember a week where I had more fun.

I hope you enjoyed living vicariously through this series. The message that I brought back with me – and I will never forget: When you think about how long you are going to be dead, the time we have is all we have – what better way to spend it than by making something?

-John

Emma International

5 comments on this post:

  1. That’s a great motto to live by. I need to embrace it more.

    Such beautiful and creative pieces. I love that one with the angular wooden stand with delicately carved bowls, all colored and textured so beautifully. And that axe… wow! Your little basket is stunning too.

    I’m glad it was such a revivifying experience for you. Kind of like a short sabbatical, I suppose. Thank you so much for sharing it all with us.

    How much Deep Woods Off did you go through?

  2. Phew! I was worried someone would hear tell of the penny embedded in the CT-18 and try to extract it with the angle grinder as final adornment for a suit of macrame armor. It only got upcycled as a holder for the baseball painting, so it got off easy.

    Congratulations on the honor and experience! *And* thank you for documenting and sharing with us.

  3. John,

    Really, really just the bowl? I would have thought that codpiece would be just the ticket for casual Fridays at the BCTW offices.

    I concur, thanks for taking us on the photo journey- so much talent and creativity.

    Best,
    Rutager

  4. Great stuff! Were any casual observers allowed entry during the graving by artificers?

    While camping in the New Hampshire & Maine woods in my youth, the only fly dope that worked was “Ole Time Woodsman’s.” It was also highly flammable and could be used to light campfires.

  5. There was one day where the public could visit but that was the extent of visitors. Of course the mosquitoes had 24/7 access.

    -John

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